MCDC News and Updates

Geocorr 2022: Now With 2020 (and 2010) PUMAs

We’ve added several new geography types to the Geocorr 2022 application. The new 2020-vintage PUMAs (public use microsample area), released just a few weeks ago, are now available. By request, we’ve also restored the 2010-vintage PUMAs to facilitate crosswalks.

Because the new PUMAs are based on the 2020 census but were released in 2022, we’re interchangeably calling them 2020 and 2022 PUMAs. (This is the same way we handled the 2010/2012 PUMAs.)

For more information about PUMAs, please refer to our “All about PUMAs” page (now due for a revision!) or the Census Bureau’s PUMA reference.

As usual, please report any errors to Glenn Rice (riceg@missouri.edu).

Post-Redistricting Geographies Now Available in Geocorr 2022

Geocorr 2022 just got better!

Many of our users have been asking when the new, post-Census-2020 Congressional districts would be available in Geocorr. The short answer is that 118th CDs are now included in Geocorr 2022, along with current state legislative districts.

A somewhat longer answer is that the U.S. Census Bureau has not yet released shapefiles or block lists for building 118th CDs or current SLDLs or SLDUs from 2020 tabulation blocks — and is not planning to do so for several months yet.

The Bureau’s Redistricting Data Office (RDO) intends to publish block equivalency files for the 118th Congress and for the 2022 state legislative districts, but not until December of 2022 at the earliest. And, the Bureau’s Geography division will not be releasing block allocation files for the same areas at all. However, the new areas will be published as shapefiles in the cartographic boundary files collection around April or May of 2023. They may also be released with the 2022 TIGER/Line shapefiles, generally around October.

Because of this lack of availability, we obtained new CD and state legislative boundary shapefiles from The American Redistricting Project, merged them, and ran intersections against 2020 TIGER/Line block shapefiles to determine how every block fits into the new districts. This was a tedious process, especially since the block and district shapefiles didn’t line up exactly, but we now have enough data to use for correlations.

With all that said, the new legislative geographies in Geocorr 2022 should be considered provisional until such time as they can be verified via official Census Bureau block equivalency files or shapefiles.

Of lesser interest (mainly for our Missouri users), Geocorr 2022 now also includes the most recent MO library districts.

As always, please contact Glenn Rice (riceg@missouri.edu) with technical questions.

Data Updates (June 2022)

We have a handful of data updates to report this spring.

In addition, for the convenience of our GIS users, we’ve added national shapefiles for the 2022-vintage congressional districts (118th Congress) and state upper- and lower-chamber legislative districts. These were compiled from individual state shapefiles downloaded from the American Redistricting Project. We have attempted to clean and normalize the attribute tables. Please note that these are not official Census Bureau shapefiles.

Please contact the MCDC website manager with any questions or comments.

Geocorr 2022

We’re happy to announce a new version of Geocorr based on 2020 decennial census geographies. Thank you for your patience!

Currently, Geocorr 2022 comprises the following geographies for all states, DC, and PR (where applicable):

  • nation (aka “Entire universe”)
  • states
  • counties
  • minor civil divisions (MCDs; includes townships and other county subdivisions)
  • tracts
  • block groups
  • blocks
  • places (towns, villages, cities, etc.) and census-designated places (CDPs)
  • core-based statistical areas (CBSAs; includes metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas)
  • upper- and lower-chamber state legislative districts
  • Congressional districts (116th Congress)
  • ZCTAs (ZIP codes)
  • NECTAs and NECTA divisions
  • elementary, secondary, and unified school districts
  • “best” school districts and types
  • county and place size categories
  • hospital service areas and referral regions

In addition, Geocorr 2022 includes the following regions for the state of Missouri only:

  • Regional Planning Commissions
  • University of Missouri Extension regions
  • MO Dept. of Economic Development (MERIC) regions
  • MO Dept. of Transportation districts
  • MO Area Agencies on Aging
  • MO BRFSS regions

We’ll add other geography types as they become available.

Longtime users of the Geocorr applications may notice a few other changes. Geocorr 2022 does not include the concentric ring pseudo-geocode options, nor the bounding box filter option. Our server logs indicated that these options were rarely used, and in a couple of instances were not actually functional. The HTML (web page) report option is now unchecked by default. The report output is the most resource- and time-intensive block of Geocorr’s code, and frequently causes program timeouts when very long reports (e.g., those using blocks) are requested.

Although Geocorr 2022 has been thoroughly tested, it should be considered a “beta” version for the moment. Please report any errors to Glenn Rice (riceg@missouri.edu).

Missouri County Pages Are Back

After a very long hiatus, the application formerly known as “Missouri County Pages” is back in operation. We’re now calling it “Missouri [County] Fact Sheets”, and a few of the old data variables have been replaced. Otherwise, the application has similar appearance and functionality to the old version.

The Missouri Fact Sheets application generates a report for any county in Missouri, including population trends, age and race, income, employment, agriculture, households and housing, poverty, education, and children and families.

See it in action here: http://mcdc.missouri.edu/applications/MO-county-factsheets/.

Application and Data Updates (April 2019)