MCDC News and Updates

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Tables for 2006-2010

MCDC is pleased to announce the debut of the 2006-2010 Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Tables in our data archive.

The Census Bureau’s EEO tabulations have served as the primary external benchmark for comparing the race, ethnicity, and sex composition of an organization’s internal workforce, and the analogous external labor market, within a specified geography and job category. These are used by organizations to develop and update their affirmative action plans.

MCDC currently has two sets of Equal Employment Opportunity tabulations (aka EEO tabs) in its data collection. In the next few months, we will be adding the latest EEO tabs (2014-2018) to our collection as well.

As always, please contact the MCDC website manager with any questions or comments.

Data Updates (June 2021)

The Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program data is now located in its own directory (sahie) in our data archive.

We’ve updated our SAS datasets pertaining to population estimates.

  • Population and components of change estimates: 2020 data added for Missouri and USA. These datasets are located in the popests directory of our data archive. The uscom20 dataset includes estimates of the total population of counties, states, and the US for July 1 of each year from 2010 to 2020, along with annual birth, death, international and domestic migration estimates (the components of change). The ushuest2020 dataset includes estimates of total housing units by county for each year from 2010 through 2020. The ussc20 dataset includes estimates of the total population of places (cities) and other subcounty geographic areas for each year starting with 2010 and ending with 2020. All of these datasets have corresponding Missouri-only versions, e.g. mohuest2020 for MO housing unit estimates.
  • Curmoests (current MO estimates): This Excel spreadsheet includes the latest available (July 1, 2020) population estimates for Missouri counties and places (incorporated cities).

Coming next month:

As always, please contact the MCDC website manager with any questions or comments.

Story Map

A Geographic Perspective on Women in Missouri Politics

With this month’s MCDC story map, designed by Abby Hunt, student intern at the Missouri Spatial Data Information Service (MSDIS), we examine which House and Senate districts of the state are represented by women and then consider why certain trends exist.

By reviewing state-level elected offices from a geographic perspective, we can begin to think about the way women influence space and politics. Although legal barriers to running for office may be gone, the glass ceiling is still very much intact when it comes to politics.

Missouri Census Data Center frequently works with MSDIS on mapping and data projects. MSDIS is a spatial data retrieval and archival system offering many mapping resources, primarily focused on the state of Missouri.

U.S. Census Bureau “Data Gem” offers a quick look at Geocorr

The U.S. Census Bureau’s Census Academy recently released a short video in its “Data Gems” series providing a brief overview about using MCDC’s Geocorr tool to create geographical correspondences. “Whether you are looking for estimates for the nation or a population count for your city block, geography is a critical element to using and accessing Census data. The State Data Center in Missouri [MCDC] developed a great resource to help us work with Census Bureau’s geographies. In this Data Gem, you will learn how to use the Geocorr to identify the geographies that make up your area.”

The Census Academy is the Bureau’s virtual hub for learning data skills, including visualization, population and housing tools, geography, and other topics. The Data Gems are a series of short “how-to” videos for data users looking to quickly enhance census data knowledge.

Story Map

Missouri Racial Demographics in Census 2010

race map illustration

About a year ago, the Missouri Census Data Center and MSDIS jointly published a story map detailing just a few of the many ways that Missouri benefits from a complete and accurate census. While the official counting period for Census 2020 has only just recently come to a close, we thought it would be interesting to take a look back at what Missouri looked like ten years ago, starting with racial demographics.

The maps in this application show the percentage of each Missouri census tract that identified as White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, American Indian, or Native Hawaiian. Unsurprisingly, the overwhelming majority of our census tracts are primarily occupied with Missourians who identified themselves as White. If you take a moment to compare the different categories, though, some very interesting patterns start to make themselves known.

Missouri Census Data Center frequently works with MSDIS on mapping and data projects. MSDIS is a spatial data retrieval and archival system offering many mapping resources, primarily focused on the state of Missouri.

Data Updates (Spring 2021)

We’ve updated many of our population-related applications and datasets over the past couple of months.

As always, please contact the MCDC website manager with any questions or comments.

Map of the Month

Missouri’s Uninsured Population, Before and After ACA

In March 2015, the U.S. Census released the 2013 data collected by the Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program (SAHIE). The SAHIE data is a valuable reference that provides annual estimates of health insurance coverage for every county in the United States. That year, MCDC published a map showing insurance coverage rates for Missouri counties. The 2013 SAHIE data was of particular interest, as that was the last round collected before the first enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or “Obamacare”).

More than five years have passed since the Affordable Care Act was enacted, and we now have an opportunity to compare rates of uninsured persons across Missouri between 2013 and 2018. These two maps both use SAHIE data and the same value scale. (Note that the 2013 map shown here differs slightly from the one we published in 2015. This is due to a different classification scheme, but the underlying data is the same.)

Uninsured in Missouri, before and after ACA

Taking a look first at the 2013 map, we can see that the percentage of uninsured working adults aged 18-64 in Missouri ranged from a low of 11.6% in St. Charles County to a high of 29,3% in Knox County. All counties in the state had an uninsured working population of 11.6% or greater.

The picture is quite different in 2018. Almost all Missouri counties now have uninsured rates of less than 20%, with many under 15%, especially in the central areas of the state. A few counties in the Kansas City and St. Louis areas have uninsured rates of less than 10%.

More significantly, the number and rates of Missouri’s most-uninsured counties have gone down substantially. In 2013, there were 20 Missouri counties where more than a quarter of the adult population were uninsured. By 2018, there were none.

Despite the differences in uninsured rates over the five-year period, one thing hasn’t changed much: The number of hospitals. In fact, between 2013 and 2018, the number of Missouri counties that lack a hospital increased from 41 to 46, according to the Missouri Hospital Profiles By County list, maintained by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS).

However, only eight of those counties — Hickory, Knox, McDonald, Morgan, Ozark, Shannon, and Wright — had uninsured populations of 20% or more in 2018. That compares with 15 counties without hospitals that had uninsured populations of 25% or more in 2013. So, the overall picture for access to affordable health care has improved.

In addition, the DHSS list of hospitals does not include smaller facilities such as rural clinics, which can better serve a rural population with higher insured rates.

ACS 2015-2019 5-year Data Is Here

We now have the 5-year ACS 2015-2019 data available on our website. The ACS Profiles and ACS Trends applications include the new data.

Both profiles and base tables (aka summary or detailed tables) are also available in SAS/Dexter format in our data archive at acs2019.

Please let us know if you encounter any issues with the data.

We’ve also made numerous small updates to our data applications and website.

Story Map

Change in Missouri Voter Turnout, 2000-2016

aerial view of downtown St. Louis

With this month’s MCDC/GRC story map, we explore the changes in voter turnout across the state between presidential elections to shed insight on how Missouri has gone from purple to bright red in just a few short years.

The map, designed by Jefferson Daubitz of the Missouri Spatial Data Information Service (MSDIS), examines the question of who votes, rather than who they vote for. It explores a variable too often ignored in politics — changes in turnout. Each map is fully interactive. Right-click on any county to open a small window that shows the change in voter turnout between each presidential election since 2000.

Missouri Census Data Center frequently works with MSDIS on mapping and data projects. MSDIS is a spatial data retrieval and archival system offering many mapping resources, primarily focused on the state of Missouri.